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Getting Fierce!

March 28th, 2012 by Brian Baumley

FierceOnlineVideo Highlights New Market7 Media & Entertainment VP Hire

Jim O’Neill over at FierceOnlineVideo just posted on Market7′s increased focus on reaching more Hollywood studios and producers. The article features some good background on Craig Heiting, Market7′s new VP and GM for media and entertainment. Check out the story here.

FierceOnlineVideo was one of the first media outlets to cover Market7,naming us as a Top Online Video Company for 2009 in its annual Fierce 15 awards.

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TV Industry Veteran Craig Heiting Joins Market7 To Lead Media & Entertainment Business

February 23rd, 2012 by Brian Baumley

Vice president and general manager brings benefits of better collaboration on media production to studios, networks and independent producers

SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 23, 2012 – Market7, Inc., a provider of web-based software for collaboration around creative content, today announced the addition of Craig Heiting as vice president and general manager for media and entertainment. A television industry veteran with a broad range of experience across the media ecosystem, he is focused on expanding adoption of Market7 by studios, networks and independent producers. Heiting is based in Los Angeles.

“Market7’s impact on content quality and operational efficiency stands out among my experiences in how video is produced and delivered,” says Heiting. “As media consumption increases, studios, television networks and other key players in production need to deliver more and better content, and Market7’s solution addresses those needs by streamlining processes and clarifying communication.”

Before joining Market7, Heiting was vice president of sales and worldwide market development with digital video networking company BigBand Networks, where he worked with Market7 founder and CEO Seth Kenvin. Prior to this, he served as vice president of North American cable television sales and strategy with Ericsson and was president of Wave Broadband, a West Coast provider of video, internet and phone services. He also worked in talent and program development with Showtime and Time Warner Cable. Heiting holds a B.A. in Journalism and Film from Marquette University.

“I am thrilled to reunite with Craig, who brings great insights about and dedication to how the media and entertainment industries fulfill their most vital initiatives of efficiently producing great content,” says Kenvin. “Market7 makes media easy for anyone creating content and Craig is extending these benefits to our established and expanding base of media and entertainment customers who are at the forefront of sophisticated production.”

The flagship video.Market7 service streamlines and enhances production through better project organization and precise communications about content throughout the lifecycle from conceptualization through pre-production like script writing and onto review and approval of footage during post. The company’s customers overcome traditional challenges and miscommunication that can typically impede production.

For more information, please visit www.market7.com.

About Market7, Inc.
Market7 addresses needs of studios, agencies, corporations and other organizations as they produce media for a wide range of purposes, including entertainment, marketing and training. The company’s flagship video.Market7 service supports all of the collaboration between video producers, their clients and any other parties involved in the process. This includes features for overall project management, conceptualization, pre-production like scripts and storyboards, and footage review during post. More information is available at www.market7.com.

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Apple And Rich Media Production

January 31st, 2012 by Seth Kenvin

Some enticing tools for beautiful content, and some striking oversights

Apple’s launch of iBooks Author ups the ante for what’s achievable in content creation. It appears to be a fluid and elegant tool for bringing together text, animation, video, images, audio and interactivity. Certainly seems more fluid and elegant than my use of WordPress right now to craft this blog post. Providing environments for content creation, we at Market7 are pleased by enhancement of how people can extend rich, media-based experiences to other people. Yet, the iBooks Author launch also exposes several areas that could be improved:

  • There is the well covered limitation of distribution techniques via iTunes and to iPad devices for consumption. It is indeed ironic to leverage technological advances in order to elegantly bring multiple types of media together, and then unnecessarily restrict how the results can be consumed.
  • Collaboration is vital in bringing together substantial works, and especially in mixed media situations because of the varieties of skills and perceptions related to the different kinds of content, but currently collaborating on iBooks Author requires saving and sending files for teammates to work on in isolation.
  • While iBooks Author may be great for bringing media together, it’s more for high-level assembly of content built in other applications, and is not a comprehensive or consistent suite for the different types of content in isolation. Granted this is an unfair criticism of a new environment sure to take on more context and deeper functionality over time, but this tool coming from Apple does cast highlight on the fact that the same company has gutted its Final Cut franchise that had emerged as the leading environment for accessible work on video content, and that never seemed to benefit from the same stewardship prioritizing great usage experience that seems clear in the results of Apple’s newest applications.

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Video Provides The Magic

November 23rd, 2011 by Seth Kenvin

21st Century Houdinis

Solid prose conveys facts. An image can artfully establish a theme. But video empowers messaging with magic to fascinate an audience.

There’s a touring museum exhibit about Harry Houdini currently in San Francisco. During the first couple decades of the 20th century Houdini rapidly rose to fame leveraging multiple media forms availed by the day’s leading edge technologies such as photography and motion pictures. Here is one of many film documentations of escape by this great artist and athlete.

It’s a strikingly sophisticated clip especially considering its period. Multiple shots and angles are used including camera rigging into structures looking straight down for a cool and distinctive perspective. Sharpness, brightness and contrasts are clear and artful across all of these perspectives with precise framing of key elements including during both horizontal and vertical tracking shots. Key information is smoothly documented such as the rigor of Houdini being bound into a straight jacket and the thousands assembled to witness his escape.

While the video is mystifying, it also exhibits how Houdini’s aim was in fact largely to demystify magic and escape. While he concealed some of his techniques, he conveyed others including in books, another medium leveraged for his prominence. In addition to the spectacle of achieving what seems impossible, it was often the cleverness of how that’s done, or sheer athleticism as in this video, with which Houdini amazed audiences.

Video can be similarly leveraged in these first couple decades of the 21st century. Contemporary audiences realize that tricks are used for amazing effects that advance a story or underscore a fact. But still we allow ourselves to be amazed so that video can make a message resonate like by no other medium.

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Script Pagination

April 8th, 2011 by Seth Kenvin

Market7 Release From Apr 6 ’11

People write all kinds of scripts: many or few scenes, heavy descriptions and/or dense amounts of dialog or light in both, varying amounts of media integrated into scripts. We have developed pagination to allow for faster load times by not waiting for an entire long script to load all at once, instead just several scenes at a time. But the right “several” isn’t the same for everyone all the time as some people’s scenes typically include just a few dozen words and others may have hundreds with multiple files uploaded to each. And, some people’s preferences can be to look at lots of scenes on-screen simultaneously or to control the perspective to a very specific set. So we’ve come up with a mechanism that defaults to showing five scenes at a time, but with a few intuitive controls enables complete customization of exactly what scenes are seen.

Here’s a demo:

Our most recent video.Market7 release also includes a few cool enhancements to the Annotative Player which we’ll get posted to the blog soon.

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On-line Video Is Next In Continuous Progress Of Promotion

October 19th, 2010 by Seth Kenvin

Extending tradition of corporate & organizational outreach

One of my frequent refrains about our business is that organizations now need to consider how to represent themselves with video similarly to how they had to consider their web presences 10-15 years ago. Last week I visited a client that’s a major consumer product provider, that’s been around for nearly a century. The reception area doubles as a company historical museum — while checking it out I was struck that online video, and before that the web, are just next iterations in a constant progression of companies taking advantage of technology to enhance and spread interaction and presence with their customers.

Through the years, and into the future, important initiatives include:

  • Choosing memorable & associative name for company, product, service
    (this one goes back before the 20th century)
  • Establishing notable brand design
    (this was primarily typography until mass printing with designs became economical)
  • Newspaper advertising
  • Brochures & printed collateral
  • Media relations and general PR
  • Radio advertising
  • In-store displays
  • Television advertising
  • Promotional email
  • Banner and other web advertising
  • Social media marketing

Interesting that as more techniques for promoting and communicating come on, the prior ones tend to maintain relevance and often thrive.

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Beautiful Software For Beautiful Production

September 19th, 2010 by Seth Kenvin

Aesthetic Merit Up On Our List With Scalability, Reliability, Performance And So On

A new customer signed up last week. I checked out the guy’s site and was struck by what gorgeous content he’s produced. But that’s of course true of many of our users. I am often consumed by the software nitty-gritty of our software for media production, and sometimes overlook the media that gets produced. It’s a privilege to have a role that facilitates such great work.

It’s also a challenge to build tools for craft. Given our customers’ strong stylistic sensibilities, it’s important that our software aesthetically appeal to them. More so, as they often point out to us, our customers use our software for work with their clients, so it’s important that through us they are effective artistic authorities. There is always much to consider about the next feature, faster service, enhancing reliability, but earning the honor of facilitating beauty merits consistent top priority by us.

Sean Dick’s expressed some interesting, related thoughts in this blog. I’ll try to get our new client’s permission to include some links to his work, and try to update this post accordingly.

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Video Production Tips Market7 Article

March 3rd, 2009 by Shannon Newton

A nice little screencast and accompanying article on Market7 by Lorraine Grula of Video Production tips.  I demo’d the software for Lorraine last week and she put this up lightening fast.  Thanks Lorraine!

This gives a nice overview of our software.  I also encourage you to look through her many production tips videos.  She has put together a nice collection of tips and software tools that would be useful to any producer.

Watch the screencast here.

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